Spotted! Yik Keat aka YK

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Self-taught urban photographer Yik Keat‘s unique colour aesthetic adds a cinematic tinge to his frames. YK states he is known for the movement in his photographs and the ability to give streets personality.

Follow YK on instagram.

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I Want To Go Home by Wesley Leon Aroozoo

I Want To Go Home Full Book Cover plus Sleeve

Mr. Takamatsu's Wedding Photograph (Photography by Jon Chan)

Mr. Takamatsu at 77 Bank Memorial Shrine (Photography by Jon Chan)

Mr.Takamatsu's View of Onagawa Bay (Photography by Jon Chan)

Mr. Takamatsu Returns from Diving (Photography by Jon Chan)

Wet Suit Out to Dry (Photography by Jon Chan)

Photography © Jon Chan

Stuck to the window of BooksActually is a poster of “I Want to go home”, a new novel by Wesley Leon Aroozoo.

About four years ago, Wesley read an article in the New York Times about Yasuo Takamatsu, a man who lost his wife to the tsunami that hit Onagawa in 2011. Since that fateful day, he has been diving every week in search for her.

“I felt an urge to meet this amazing man. It took me months to locate and reach out to him. Eventually I had the chance to spend time with this lovely man in Onagawa in the summer of 2015. The novel is named after the last SMS that Yasuo Takamatsu received from his wife who saw the impending tsunami. Since then Mr. Takamatsu hopes to fulfil his wife’s last request. I didn’t want his inspiring story to be an article that came and went. I decided to share this man’s story of loss, recovery and determination to reunite with his wife in a novel.”

I Want To Go Home is a dual-language singular book in Japanese and English published by Math Paper Press. Look out for the book launch late September!

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Banner Shuffle! Sean Cham

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“The photographs are from the Yesteryears series, which captures forgotten and abandoned buildings in Singapore. Happy 52nd Birthday Singapore!” – Sean Cham.

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I’ve Cot You by Zinkie Aw

In I’ve Cot you (Sayang, Sarong Baby), photographer Zinkie Aw sets out to document families that are still practising the cloth baby cradle in Singapore. She hopes that through sets of photographs made in documentary and conceptual styles, viewers imagine that slice of memory lane that we could never remember as a baby in the cot, as well as appreciate an old trend that increasingly gets labelled as archaic.

(from the press release)

Most of us used to be sarong cloth cradle or 摇篮 (‘yao lan’ cradle), also know endearingly as ‘yo-nah’ babies.

Were you one?

As babies, we could never give a testimonial, or recall that experience.

Via the ‘yao lan’ or sarong cradle as a cultural icon for interviews, this body of work focuses on family bonding, Singapore’s shared values, and ties in with a sense of collective cultural heritage via exploring memories of the family unit.

Sayang, the sarong baby.

The exhibition opens on 6 August and runs through 30 September at the Tampines Regional Library, Our Tampines Hub, L2 – L6.

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Spotted! Cassandra Goh

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Cassandra Goh calls herself a communicator, shooting stories that are heavy with visual activism. “My passion lies in sustainability – environmental and social concerns -, travel and adventure.”

In the featured series titled A Mode of Being Apart, Cassandra focuses her lens on the ongoing separatist conflict in Xinjiang. “Especially on the issue of discrimination which has caused tension between Han Chinese and Uyghurs, highlighting the enforcement of human rights in Xinjiang.”

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