Spotted! Lim Jia Qi Jacey

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Fleeting Encounters (2017)

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Stigma of Blessings 2016

Stigma of Blessings (2016)

Fresh graduate Jacey has always been intrigued by the nineteenth-century French literary concept, Flaneur. “A flaneur is a stroller, a passionate spectator of life and its surroundings, while remaining as a detached observer,” she explains. “To stand in the shoes of this figure is the constant starting point of my work: the observation of the crowd. Situating myself as a bystander, social narratives and human interactions are the common themes that I tend to dwell into.”

Talking about printmaking techniques, Jacey tells us that she finds the process of creating the image highly detached from the final print. “Ink is transferred from one surface to another, rendering a familiar image I’ve been working on, thus making it foreign. This detachment, being both “part of” and “apart from”, parallels with the third person’s perspective I tend to place myself in when approaching my art.”

Merging prints and installation, Jacey also has a keen interest in creating site-specific work. “I like to play with space and open up new perspectives in a medium often considered traditional.”

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Household Clouds by Matthew Sia & Emily Kwa

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© IllumiArts Village

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© IllumiArts Village

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© Singapore W.O.W.!

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© Singapore W.O.W.!

Household Clouds is a light exhibition conceptualised and curated by Graphic/Interactive designer Matthew Sia and Designer/Illustrator Emily Kwa.

“We used the given space at Woodgrove to create different light installations and make the space into an exhibition for the public. The installation was created out of mundane objects that are familiar through our daily connections — taken for granted and more often than not ignored. The objects were given new prominence, consideration and visibility by being elevated into the arena of art. And then, sometimes, it is really creating unexpected spaces, unexpected relationships.”

Household Clouds was part of Singapore W.O.W.! and the IllumiArts Village in 2016.

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Lost in the Midst of Time by Kayleigh Goh

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On her website, Kayleigh Goh posted that she is interested in the psychological and poetic implication of place, a specific locale or environment that has a character on its own. “Looking at how places constitute different experiences and evoke different emotions, I am informed by my everyday experiences of everyday places,” she writes. “With outputting the collected information into my paintings, I turn the intangible into tangible. I see my artworks as capsules of these experiences. With everyday construction materials as my paint and canvas, alongside my soft palette, my works often speak more about the quiet places.”

Clicking on the Artworks tab on her site takes you to 3 projects. Here, Kayleigh tells us about Lost in the Midst of Time, an installation that presents the viewer with her experience and perception of the older buildings tucked within an overwhelming city environment.

“These quiet, slow-paced spaces are slowly left behind by time. Visually inspired by the cracks and peeling paint around Waterloo Centre, this painting installation incorporates construction materials and debris as both canvas and paint. Adopting the language of aging architecture, combined with a soft palette, I contemplate the impermanence of the structures around us.”

 

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The lowdown on SG Heart Map @Float

(from the press release)

From 26 till 29 November, SG Heart Map will unveil the first-ever crowd-sourced heart map of Singaporeans’ cherished places at the Float @ Marina Bay.

Inspired by the stories shared, seven artists across different creative and arts communities, have created immersive and poignant works of art for the SG Heart Map. The artists include Gwen Lee, Kenny Leck, Michael Ng, Royston Tan, Tia Boon Sim and Zaihan Kariyani, William Chan  and Zul Mahmod. Stories of Singaporeans will be told through various art forms such as prose, poetry, a film, sketches, photographs, audio installations, illustrations and animations – to be showcased at the SG Heart Map Festival @ Float.

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50 First Kisses by Royston Tan and Outdoor Cinema
50 First Kisses is an emotive anthology showcasing 50 Singaporean couples and their most heart-warming moments, which took place at cherished places in Singapore. Set against the backdrop of iconic landmarks in Singapore, the film will take the audience through time, bringing back memories of sentimental moments in the past, while celebrating the success and modernity of Singapore today.

Wordplay! A Literary Playground by Kenny Leck
Led by Kenny Leck, this playground features 20 literary art works in the form of prose and poetry authored by a team of 10 established local writers. They drew inspiration from the SG Heart Map stories relating to the theme of childhood, covering topics such as kite-flying and the all-time favourite playgrounds.

Future City Vision by Michael Ng
Just as how past city planners have shaped Singapore into our much loved city today, Future City Vision by Michael Ng, founding member of OIC Singapore (Organisation of Illustrators Council), invites visitors to immerse themselves in the imaginative future of Singapore through the larger-than-life pop-up illustrations created together with some 100 students.

Darren Soh, Punggol Waterway Terraces

HomeScapes by Gwen Lee
Five well-known photographers – Ang Song Nian, Bob Lee, Darren Soh, George Wong and Robert Zhao will present the HomeScapes Photography Exhibition at the SG Heart Map Festival @ Float. Led and curated by Gwen Lee, director of the Singapore International Photography Festival (SIPF), the exhibition presents the theme of home with many untold stories of the common and ordinary in our midst. Narrated through the images captured by the five photographers, these stories range from those of Singaporeans in their living rooms and their display cabinets that curate their personal memories and life events, to scenery and façades of flats that illustrate the progress of our living environment, and animals found in Singapore that co-habit with us in our space.

SonicMemories by Zul Mahmod
Sound artist Zul Mahmod will showcase SonicMemories, an audio installation created with recordings that reflect familiar experiences at national, cultural and celebratory events, such as the crowd’s excitement during the commissioning parade for Officer Cadets or the joyful music played at weddings. They also include personal interpretations of special occasions that have taken place in the heartlands such as the Bedok Reservoir and Whampoa. SonicMemories will feature the mailbox – key in bringing people together before the advent of email and social media – as the centerpiece and intermediary to convey these cherished stories.

Scenes of Our Hearts Showcase by Urban Sketchers Singapore
From August till September this year, Tia Boon Sim and Zaihan Kariyani (Urban Sketchers Singapore) led some 400 Singaporeans to capture the poignant perspectives of life in Singapore through sketching on location around the island. From our quaint streets to the everyday city

A Beautiful Day by William Chan at the Dome
‘A Beautiful Day’ is a documentation of Singapore from dawn to night. Featuring the 50 SG Heart Map places, it brings visitors on a visual journey of the many places that trace the progress of Singapore story. The animation projected on the dome also brings to life the 50 SG Heart Map places contributed by Singaporeans and inspires the rediscovery of the beauty of our landscape.

(All images courtesy of SG Heart Map)

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Project Plug: Progress for Progress’s Sake

We spotted Shen Jiaqi‘s work at uh:Art,  an exhibition showcasing the work of 14 NIE BA students. Progress for Progress’s Sake is a reflection of Jiaqi’s experience in the Singapore Education system both as a student and a teacher. “As an artist and educator, my works explore the complexity and fragility of humanity by revealing layers that we have chosen to conceal and questioning issues that we had chosen to disregard.”

“Using the imagery of the medieval rose window, my installation draws on how success and progress through education is often a lofty ideal, whereas isolation through discrimination and fear of association with failure is ever-present in our society. This installation is an immersive experience, and visitors are welcome to complete the artwork by sitting on the student’s chair.”

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