Spotted! Moses Tan

Moses Tan-In Shadows

In Shadows

Moses Tan_Performing for the Casuarinas

Performing for the Casuarinas imagines acts of passion as slow waltz in which it is performed for the Casuarinas.

Moses tan-Hands on Back

Hands on Back started out as a plan for a video work and is depicted as a film still.

You cannot climb peony mountain

Having majored in Fine Arts from LASALLE College of the Arts, Moses Tan‘s work flits between disciplines and includes drawings, video and sound installations. “I was also formerly trained in Chemistry and Biological Chemistry and I’m interested in exploring ideas of poetry and allegories that can be found from theories in Chemistry.”

Mo’s work revolves around themes of queer politics and sociopolitical issues, and pulls inspiration from the theories of philosophers Judith Butler and Karen Barad. In 2016, he picked up the Winston Oh Travel Award which allowed him to travel to Beijing and extend his research on queer issues.

“The award allowed me to conduct field research in Beijing, which got me to look at ideas of corrective therapy for queer individuals. With that, ideas of denial and rejection helped to enhance my understanding of queer melancholia as a result of denial of desires so as to fit into a heteronormative society. Through my research trip, some of the methods of corrective therapy ranged from counselling to electroshock therapy and one of the methods used was to snap a rubber band on the wrist any time an ‘unwanted’ desire occurs. I also managed to survey two cruising sites which coincidentally had slopes where the cruising would normally occur. The work is a translation of all these ideas where a fictional mountain (the name is formed from the two parks that were the cruising sites) and in that way, posing the mountain as a metaphor for the body. Also inspired by a text by Karen Bermann about spaces and by the peony flower which is an unofficial national flower of China. I was interested in the metaphorical nature of the peony flower (which in Chinese is also mudane) which was then translated into a book where images of the sites were hidden.”

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