Spotted! Kai Hwei Kwok

Kai1

Kai2

Product Designer Kai Hwei Kwok, will be graduating from the School of Art, Design Media, this May. Her work reveals her diverse interests in design, exploring different possibilities and pushing the boundaries.

Taking a more back-to-basic approach, the featured chair incorporates elements seen in the 1950s’s furniture design, presenting bold cuts and angles. “Through combining these qualities with a modern touch, it offers a brand new look,” Kai adds. “The unique V shaped cut at the back of the chair is the main essence of the chair. Getting inspiration from a flower core resulted in the extensive use of curvatures when designing it. Using teak as a medium, I hope to offer something nostalgic yet modern at the same time.”

Enjoy the heck out of the other beautiful designs on Kai’s coroflot page.

Share
  • godwin

    That looks real nice, but it also looks like it might be a 3D render, I can’t be sure (is that even important?). Anyway I’m just wondering how construction might happen for such an object, and if that factors into the design and sourcing and selecting of materials. Now, I know next to nothing about woodwork or carpentry, but it doesn’t seem plausible or sustainable to get that kind of woodgrain in that shape and size. I’m prepared to be proven wrong though! (To that end, showing the process of design might be interesting too to a viewer or potential client, it doesn’t have to be about clean, clinical presentation all the time) Also: is the object an exercise in aesthetic exploration, or an application of such to utility?

  • godwin

    That looks real nice, but it also looks like it might be a 3D render, I can’t be sure (is that even important?). Anyway I’m just wondering how construction might happen for such an object, and if that factors into the design and sourcing and selecting of materials. Now, I know next to nothing about woodwork or carpentry, but it doesn’t seem plausible or sustainable to get that kind of woodgrain in that shape and size. I’m prepared to be proven wrong though! (To that end, showing the process of design might be interesting too to a viewer or potential client, it doesn’t have to be about clean, clinical presentation all the time) Also: is the object an exercise in aesthetic exploration, or an application of such to utility?

  • teeParty

    It looks more like an exploration of concept and aesthetics than on manufacturing processes. Having the chair carved out from a block of teak is unsustainable. However, by the looks of its simplistic design, it is definitely possible to manufacture using plywood or metal sheets cut and bent into shape, or even plastic mouldings. All these will, however, translate a very different story to the piece incontext. That said, laminates can be an option to achieve the kind of texture and color as desired. Possibilities are there. Good job KW!

  • teeParty

    It looks more like an exploration of concept and aesthetics than on manufacturing processes. Having the chair carved out from a block of teak is unsustainable. However, by the looks of its simplistic design, it is definitely possible to manufacture using plywood or metal sheets cut and bent into shape, or even plastic mouldings. All these will, however, translate a very different story to the piece incontext. That said, laminates can be an option to achieve the kind of texture and color as desired. Possibilities are there. Good job KW!

  • kaiweikwok

    hey, thanks for your comments!
    besides what Teeparty suggested about using plywood to heat bent in to shape, it also could be possible to have it the 3d model translated into parts to be CNC, joined and sanded down. By doing in parts, i think that could reduced on the volume of wastage too. And ,in order to get the sort of grains I had in the render, probably requires some lamination.

    kai~

  • kaiweikwok

    hey, thanks for your comments!
    besides what Teeparty suggested about using plywood to heat bent in to shape, it also could be possible to have it the 3d model translated into parts to be CNC, joined and sanded down. By doing in parts, i think that could reduced on the volume of wastage too. And ,in order to get the sort of grains I had in the render, probably requires some lamination.

    kai~

About

Culturepush tracks cool stuff in art, culture and design in Singapore.


Contact Us.



Need a Job?

Click here to find/post a job.

What's Happening?

Subscribe to our Events on Facebook.